Articles

We already know how great bamboo nappies are for babies bots but did you know that every day in Australia, over 1.3 million disposable nappies are discarded into landfills, that’s over 475 million nappies per year. Every disposable nappy ever dumped still exists today as they take centuries to break down . . . scary isn’t it! The average baby uses 6,000 disposables which equates to approx $3,500 per child and an estimated 5% of landfill waste. Between 2001 and 2011 there were 2,957,721 births in Australia, had they all been placed into disposable nappies there would have been over $10 billion dollars spent. Thankfully we do have an alternative in modern cloth na...

Bamboo fabrics will maintain their special qualities when washed in cold to warm water (up to 60 degrees Celsius) with a gentle detergent, free of bleach. You may want to use a gentle cycle for some finished garments and fabric types. If necessary, bamboo fabrics can be dried in a clothes dryer on the cool setting. Note: Fabrics containing vegetable dye should be dried away from direct sunlight. Washing We recommend washing rather than dry cleaning for our Bamboo and or hemp fabrics. Use the gentle wash cycle or hand wash and use a good brand of gentle soap powder o...

Hot on the heels of winning the Annual Momentum Energy 3AW Small Business Success Award for Innovative Business, local Melbourne Mum and EcoSleep Australia founder Jane Tepper, is frantically packing her bags for the requested rush launch of her award winning, eco-friendly, Coshee® bedding range in the US next month. “I was thrilled to win the Award and getting an unexpected call to launch Coshee® with our agent via the ABC Kids Expo is a real bonus” said Jane who designed Coshee® to ease the daily grind of bed making and the huge task of washing five quilt covers for her family. Coshee®, short for cover sheet, is a ...

Nepalese village women hand pick the wild nettle from the forests of the Himalayas to make into beautiful and delicate scarves. Wild Nettle, also referred to as the Himalayan Giant Nettle or 'Allo', grows wild in the mountains in eastern Nepal. It reaches a height of three metres and has long, stinging hairs covering its stem and leaves. The nettle for these scarves comes from Sankhuwasabha District. Processing of the wild nettle fibre involves stripping the fibrous inner bark from the plant then boiling in water and wood ash. The mixture is then left to simmer overnight. The next step involves beating the pulp to remove the fibre. The f...